Athlos Academy of Utah

Parents » Grading Practices at Athlos

Grading Practices at Athlos

Report cards at Athlos Academy of Utah

At Athlos Academy, we use multiple avenues to track and share student progress, including:
  • Regular and ongoing communication between the school and families
  • Student-led conferences twice a year
  • Student portfolios
  • Quarterly standards-based grading report cards
 

What is standards-based grading?

When your child comes home with the traditional letter-grade report card, you may be left wondering why they received a "C", or perhaps if your child gets an "A", does that mean there is no room for improvement? Standards-based grading is designed to give you a consistent, accurate, and informative snapshot of what your child knows and can do at a particular point in time. Student learning is measured by proficiency in reaching learning targets, based on the state standards in each subject. It is possible with this kind of grading to specifically identify your child's strengths and areas for improvement.
 
Behaviors such as absences, turning in work on time, staying on task, etc., are graded separately from academic achievement. Although we understand that the two are intrinsically linked, by looking at academic performance and behaviors separately, it gives a clearer perspective of how your child can progress. Behaviors are reported under "Characteristics of a Successful Learner" and "Attendance".
 
Please resist the urge to compute proficiency levels with letter grades. A level 3 means that a student has met the learning target and is deemed "proficient". A level 4 means that the child has gone above and beyond the learning target—it is a grade that is only awarded for exceptionality!
 

What should I do with my child's report card?

  • Resist the urge to compute proficiency levels with letter grades.
  • Talk with your child about the report card. Ask him or her to reflect on areas of strength and areas of challenge. Celebrate successes and help your child set goals related to areas of challenge.
  • Spend time looking at the "Characteristics of a Successful Learner" and "Attendance" sections. Does anything stand out? Discuss with your child any goals or strategies for improvement in those areas.
  • If you have questions relating to grades or concerns regarding your child's performance, get in touch with your child's teacher.